Experiment 09

AN ARCHITECTURE OF "HUMEURS"

R&Sie(n) ARCHITECTS & FRANCOIS JOUVE

January 22, 2010 - May 16, 2010

 

Animist, vitalist and machinist, the architecture of “humeurs” rearticulates the need to confront the unknown in a contradictory manner by means of computational and mathematical assessments. The architecture of “humeurs” is also a tool that will give rise to “Multitudes” and their palpitation and heterogeneity, the premises of a relational organization protocol.

This research is being carried out with François Jouve, the mathematician in charge of working out dynamic structural strategies; Marc Fornes with Winston Hampel and Natanael Elfassy in charge of computational development; the architect and robotics designer Stephan Henrich; and Gaetan Robillard and Frédéric Mauclere for the physiological data collection station, following a scenario by Berdaguer and Péjus. It also uses Marc Kendall’s process of data collection using “microneedles.”


Le Laboratoire and Caroline Naphegyi (artistic director), have been following this research for two years and give the unique possibility of watching it exhibited in its current development.

A project exploring new modes of architectural structuring and transaction:

 

  • One aspect is comprised by computational, mathematical and machinist procedures designed to produce an urban structure following certain protocols. These successive indeterminate, improbable and uncertain aggregations will rearticulate the link between the individual and the collective.

  • The other aspect is the scanning of the neuro-biological emissions of each visitor so as to analyze their chemical composition. Until now the collection of information involved in the residential unit protocol has been based on visible and reductive data (area, way of life, number of rooms, mode of access, neighborhood frontiers).

In contrast, this experiment will provide the occasion for an interrogation of the shadowy “emission of desires” through the scanning of certain physiological signals, and the implementation of a chemistry of the moods of future purchasers taken as inputs generating a diversity of habitable morphologies and the relationships between them.

Download the press release.

 

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom

press to zoom
1/4

About R&Sie(n)

R&Sie(n) held(s) several professorships with François Roche, in London at Bartlett School, in Vienna at TU, in Barcelona at ESARQ, in Paris at ESA, in Philadelphia at UPenn, and is teaching now in advanced studio at Columbia NY, USA. with speeches at MIT, Havard, AA School, UCLA, Sci-Arch…

Their projects have been exhibited at the Tate Modern (London 2006), Columbia University (New-York, 1999-2000), UCLA (Los Angeles, 1999-2000), ICA (London, 2001),   Mori Art Museum (Tokyo, 2004), the Pompidou Center (Paris, 2003),  MAM / Musee d’Art Moderne (Paris, 2005, 2006), Pavillon de l’Arsenal (Paris, 2006), Orléans/ArchiLab International Architectural Conference (1999, 2001, 2003). R&Sie(n) were among the architects selected by France for the 1990, 1996, 2000 and 2002 (refused) Venice Architectural Biennale, and were also featured in the 2000, 2004 international selection.

R&Sie(n) held(s) several professorships with François Roche, in London at Bartlett School, in Vienna at TU, in Barcelona at ESARQ, in Paris at ESA, in Philadelphia at UPenn, and is teaching now in advanced studio at Columbia NY, USA. with speeches at MIT, Havard, AA School, UCLA, Sci-Arch…

Their projects have been exhibited at the Tate Modern (London 2006), Columbia University (New-York, 1999-2000), UCLA (Los Angeles, 1999-2000), ICA (London, 2001),   Mori Art Museum (Tokyo, 2004), the Pompidou Center (Paris, 2003),  MAM / Musee d’Art Moderne (Paris, 2005, 2006), Pavillon de l’Arsenal (Paris, 2006), Orléans/ArchiLab International Architectural Conference (1999, 2001, 2003). R&Sie(n) were among the architects selected by France for the 1990, 1996, 2000 and 2002 (refused) Venice Architectural Biennale, and were also featured in the 2000, 2004 international selection.

François Roche – Born 25-02-1961 in Paris / Licensed Architect (DPLG), diploma 1987 Versailles, France, U.P.A. no.3.

Stéphanie Lavaux – Born 11-06-1966 in Saint Denis, La Reunion / Leave the French National School of Fine Arts (ENSBA) in 1990, Paris, France.

Jean Navarro – Born 28-05-71, in Neuilly / Licensed Architect (DPLG), diploma 1999 Versailles, France, U.P.A. no.4

About Francois Jouve

My research relates to applied mathematics, more specifically to numerical analysis and scientific calculus. I am interested in the mathematical modeling of physical and biological phenomena as well as in the study of the equations that fall out of this modeling and the implementation of approximate methods of resolution of these equations using computers. This branch of mathematics developed rapidly during the 1960s with the advent of the first sophisticated computers able to perform calculations impossible to carry out on paper. The field borrows both from advances in the other sciences to which it can be applied and from the most up-to-date techniques in mathematics. Its growth is facilitated by increasingly powerful computerized calculations enabling ever more complex forms of modeling. Although originally confined to research questions in sciences such as physics or the mechanics of liquids and solids, where mathematical jargon is the norm, numerical analysis has more recently been shown to be applicable to the modeling of research problems in the fields of chemistry, biology, economics and medicine.


Part of my research has been carried out in collaboration with ophthalmologists in the modeling of refractive surgery (the goal of which is to correct vision problems such as myopia (shortsightedness) and astigmatisms) and in the development of new intraocular implants used in cataract surgery. I am additionally interested in the problems of optimization of forms wherein we attempt to discover ‘optimal forms’ that best satisfy a number of given constraints – a kind of ‘list of specifications’. A typical example of this type of problem is finding the best compromise between the weight and the rigidity of an object made out of a given material having certain mechanical properties. It is this area of my research, and the original forms it gave rise to following the algorithms we developed, that was the starting point of my collaboration with R&Sie. These research problems, in which the form is unknown – problems which might be classified under the heading ‘inverse problems’ – have a number of applications in extremely varied fields ranging from industry to petroleum prospecting, and even including medical imaging.